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A Behind the Scenes Look at Jenny Han's NY Screening of 'To All The Boys I've Loved Before'
Posted by Marie on August 18, 2018

In anticipation of the weekend's Netflix premiere of To All the Boys I've Loved Before, Goodreads met up with author Jenny Han at an advanced screening of her hit YA rom-com in New York. After the film, Goodreads Co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief Elizabeth Khuri Chandler moderated a panel that included star Lana Condor, director Susan Johnson, and of course, Jenny Han herself.

Below are a few highlights from the event. Don't forget to add Han's book to your Want to Read shelf before tuning into the adaptation!


This post is sponsored by To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before.



We Asked, You Answered: Is Listening to Audiobooks 'Reading'?
Posted by Marie on August 17, 2018



This post is sponsored by Audible.

In recent years, more and more bibliophiles are turning to audiobooks as a way to discover new stories (and re-discover old favorites). At Goodreads, we know that books can be experienced in many different ways—which is why audiobooks count toward your Reading Challenge. But as their popularity grows, there's still the occasional debate as to whether listening to audiobooks can be considered the same as "reading."

We turned to our followers on Facebook and Twitter for their opinions and received a wide array of responses on how audiobooks have expanded their horizons. Which ones resonate with you? Let us know in the comments!


1. "I do consider it reading. Reading isn’t just about looking at the words on the page or hearing words as they’re being read. It’s about processing, imagining, and understanding. Science has shown those processes are similar whether reading with your eyes, your ears, or your fingers," says Buddy.

2. "If you strictly base it on the technical definition of reading, they're certainly not the same. They're different language skills. But I think the whole point of both is the consumption of literature. That's why it doesn't matter if you read [a book] or listened to it," says Calvin.

3. "1000% counts as reading. You’re still absorbing the material, just in a different format. And let’s not forget that [they are] extremely helpful, if not completely necessary, for the visually impaired!" says Michal.

4. "I don’t consider it reading, although I understand why some people need audiobooks and prefer them. I think reading an actual book is just a totally different experience then listening to one," says Jessica.

5. "Audiobooks are great for those those looking to experience a book while walking or exercising, or those with vision problems. But that’s called listening. Reading is with your eyes. Not better. Just different," says Jeanne.

6. "Yes, I consider it reading. I’m still dedicating time to the story and following along. I’ve 're-read' a couple of books this way and actually picked up on new details I hadn’t before. It was exciting for me," says Belinda.

7. "I like to listen to audiobooks when I'm hiking or driving long distances. I used to think it was 'cheating,' but listening to a story is just an alternative form of enjoying a book," says Andrea.

8. "They don’t provide the exact same experience, but they both provide incredible stories. I think the coolest part is how audiobooks have modernized the human tradition of telling stories out loud with the spoken word," says Nick.

9. "By one definition, audiobooks aren't reading. But by the definition of reading as 'interpretation,' I think it fits," says Raygina.

10. "In the same way that Braille is still 'reading' even though it technically does not involve visual processing of written information, audiobooks involve construction of visual interpretations of the information conveyed through symbolic language. Essentially, reading." says Josh.



Do you consider listening to audiobooks the same as reading? Share your two cents in the comments!

For more inspiration, check out the Goodreads' audiobooks page, brought to you by Audible.

Check out more recent blogs:
12 Things Readers Really Want Nonreaders to Know
Back-to-School Reading for Adults: The Best New Nonfiction
Catch Up Now: These Big Series All Have Books Coming Out in September

20 Children's Books With Strong Female Characters
Posted by Cybil on August 16, 2018



This post is sponsored by LEGO Friends.

Children's books featuring bold and brave girls are both becoming easier for parents to find, and also cover a large range of topics sure to appeal to every type of young reader. Check out these 20 children's books featuring strong female characters. Each of these picks has earned at least a four-star average rating from fellow readers—reviews from kids and parents alike.

You'll find some long-time favorite characters here, including Pippi and Anne, and meet some new girls whose interests and passions include science, politics, civil rights, space travel, ninjas, sharks, and reading.

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Have a great children's book recommendation to add to the mix? Please share it with your fellow readers in the comments!

Check out more recent blogs:

Beginner Book Club Picks from Our Readers
Bill Gates Shares His Top Picks for Summer Reading
The Hottest Books of Summer

Catch Up Now: These Big Series All Have Books Coming Out in September
Posted by Hayley on August 15, 2018

There's nothing like the pain of finishing a book with a cliffhanger…and needing to wait months (if not years) for the next book. Save yourself some misery and jump into a beloved series that has a new installment coming out in September!

To find these series, we rounded up the top September sequels your fellow Goodreads can't wait to read, which we measure by how many times a book has been added to Want to Read shelves. Below, we've featured the first book in each of these series—as well as the first line to give you a taste. Which ones pique your curiosity?


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Genre: Mystery
First book: The Cuckoo's Calling
First line: "The buzz in the street was like the humming of flies."

Lethal White, book #4 in the series, hits bookshelves on September 18.


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Genre: YA science fiction
First book: Warcross
First line: "It's too damn cold a day to be out on a hunt."

Wildcard, book #2 in the series, hits bookshelves on September 18.


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Genre: Fantasy
First book: Vicious
First line: "Victor readjusted the shovels on his shoulders and stepped gingerly over an old, half-sunken grave."

Vengeful, book #2 in the series, hits bookshelves on September 25


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Genre: YA historical fiction
First book: Stalking Jack the Ripper
First line: "I placed my thumb and forefinger on the icy flesh, spreading it taut above the breastbone as Uncle had showed me."

Escaping from Houdini, book #3 in the series, hits bookshelves on September 18.


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Genre: Middle grade fantasy
First book: Iron Trial
First line: "From a distance, the man struggling up the white face of the glacier might have looked like an ant crawlingly slowly up the side of a dinner plate."

The Golden Tower, book #5 in the series, hits bookshelves on September 11.


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Genre: YA fantasy
First book: Three Dark Crowns
First line: "A young queen stands barefoot on a wooden block with her arms outstretched."

Two Dark Reigns, book #3 in the series, hits bookshelves on September 4.


What big sequels are you looking forward to? Come talk books with us in the comments!

Check out more recent blogs:
20 Children's Books with Strong Female Characters
7 Great Books Hitting Shelves Today
Back-to-School Reading for Adults: The Best New Nonfiction

7 Great Books Hitting Shelves Today
Posted by Hayley on August 14, 2018

Need another excuse to go to the bookstore this week? We've got you covered with the buzziest new releases of the day.

To create our list, we focused on the top books Goodreads members can't wait to read, which we measure by how many times a book has been added to Want to Read shelves. All these highly anticipated titles are now available! Which ones catch your eye?


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You should read this book if you like: Fiction, bank robberies, unflinching portrayals of the opioid crisis, war veterans, the dark heart of America, powerful prose, black humor

Walker wrote his debut novel in prison. Check out the books he's read behind bars that have made a difference to him.


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You should read this book if you like: Science fiction, The Three-Body Problem, mysterious natural phenomena, scientific quests, particle physics, experimental military weapons labs



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You should read this book if you like: Historical fiction, The Deverill Chronicles, Ireland, countesses and castles, long-held secrets, epic romance, preserving family legacy



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You should read this book if you like: Mysteries, legal thrillers, the Rosata & Dinunzio series, twisted murder investigations, taking down ruthless enemies, Machiavellian schemes



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You should read this book if you like: Memoirs, intimate family portraits, the Hamptons, wedding weekends, grappling with questions of loyalty and tradition, dysfunctional relatives



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You should read this book if you like: Dystopian fiction, apocalyptic satire, millennial drones, plagues of Biblical proportions, quirky "coming-of-adulthood" stories, survivors

Discover more exciting new voices with our roundup of the best debuts of the season!


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You should read this book if you like: Contemporary romance, Swear on This Life, unhappy suburban housewives, life-changing kisses, surprisingly seductive psych studies, electric chemistry




Back-to-School Reading for Adults: The Best New Nonfiction
Posted by Hayley on August 13, 2018

Who says old dogs can't learn new tricks? Inspired by all the kids heading back to school, we rounded up the best recently published books for curious grown-ups.

Whether you're eager to know more about the planet or politics, want to change the world or yourself, we've got you covered. To find the most educational and entertaining books published from January to August of this year, we focused on the books that have been added the most to Goodreads members' shelves. Then we narrowed down our list to contain only books with at least a four-star average rating.

Ready to hit the books? Check out the recommendations, divided by subject matter, and add what catches your eye to your Want to Read shelf.


Recent Events 101

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History 101

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Self Help 101

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True Crime 101

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Business 101

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Present Matters 101

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Parenting 101

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Science 101

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Planet Earth 101

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Politics 101

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The Future 101

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12 Things Readers Really Want Nonreaders to Know
Posted by Hayley on August 10, 2018



Every reader has friends or family members who just don't get it. "Why do you read so much?" they might ask, staring at your overflowing bookshelves or your Reading Challenge on Goodreads. "I haven't read an entire book in years."

Oh, those poor, unfortunate souls… Haven't they heard about the very real scientific benefits of reading—like stress reduction and improved sleep? We asked our followers on Facebook and Twitter to share one thing about the comfort, joy, and importance of reading they wish nonreaders could understand. Check out some of our favorite responses below!


1. "Best therapy money can buy…or borrow for free with a library card. Reading helps me sleep, helps me forget about the day, and helps me relax in general." -Sarah

2. "Opening a beer when you get home will reward you for an hour. Opening a book when you get home will reward you for life." -Douglass

3. "Reading teaches you empathy, and it really gives you a chance to examine all the grey areas of life. You get to think about and see things from other perspectives—it's awesome!" -Nyeisha

4. "I feel like I have friends all over the world, through space and time, who I can visit whenever I need a break from my own life." -Kat

5. "Books are better than the movie. There is so much going on in the minds of the characters that movies can't show. To really understand the movie characters you love, read the book." -Linda

6. "The smells of books, whether they're new and old, are enjoyable and pair well with tea or coffee. People who are loathe to read are missing out on smell-o-vision." -Ian

7. "It's one of the ultimate escapes. You can forget where you are and who you are. There have been times I've gone to Middle-earth and Hogwarts and Narnia in my head just to survive… Everyone should have that blessed escape." -Ruby

8. "The more I read the easier it is to express what I am thinking or feeling. Thanks to books, I have the words." -Melanie

9. "You will always have friends. Real life doesn't always hand you the right people. But a book is the perfect place to find your people whenever you need them." -Gillian

10. "Don't give up on reading just because you tried one or two books that didn't do it for you. Keep trying, and I'm sure you will find your niche or genre. When you do, you'll be so glad you did!" -Wes

11. "Reading to me is like unconditional love. I always feel like I'm home when I read a book." -Susan

12. "Used correctly, a book can transport the reader on an instant mental vacation with no jet lag, TSA, or dysentery!" -Todd


Tell us how you share your love of books with nonreaders in the comments!

Check out more recent blogs:
7 Great Books Hitting Shelves Today
Published from Prison: The Books That Inspired a Former Bank Robber
20 Hottest Debuts of the Season


Don't Get Stuck in Your Genre: How War Movies and Zombies Inspired a Romance Novelist
Posted by Hayley on August 09, 2018

You know what you like, right? Kristen Ashley thought she did. The bestselling romance author, whose books like Mystery Man and Rock Chick have earned more than a million ratings from readers on Goodreads, wanted her stories sweet, sultry, and always full of heart. Then she let a series of gritty films and one sexy apocalypse change her mind. Here Ashley shares how she expanded her reading horizons and why she thinks you should branch out, too.



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I once made an insane deal with my boyfriend: I promised him I'd watch ten movies, whatever he recommended—no excuses not to watch.

He knew my preferences. I liked romantic and feel-good films, or anything with strong female characters, like Billy Elliott and Practical Magic. He also knew I never watched horror, prison, suspense, or war movies. I just found them hard to take.

The first three films he "made" me watch? Rear Window, edge-of-your-seat suspense; Cool Hand Luke, a prison movie; and The Hill, a prisoner-of-war movie. Ugh.

But guess what? They were all superb, so good that they redefined my way of thinking.

I learned not to shut the door on things I didn't think I could enjoy. And thank God, or I never would have watched the brilliant Get Out and so many other films along the way.

Why am I talking movies on a book lovers' forum? Because I so often hear the same things said about the subgenres in romance. "I've read everything you've written, except your fantasy. I don't read fantasy." Then, later: "I had to read another of your books, so I tried your fantasy. I loved it!"

I, too, was recently confronted with this by a book from my friend, and a writer I very much enjoy, Kylie Scott. Her book Flesh is a ménage romance set in—wait for it—the months after a zombie apocalypse.

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I don't normally do zombies. Now I was going to read a zombie apocalypse ménage romance?

I thought about that question for a good five minutes. The answer was yes.

And then I couldn't put the book down. Kylie writes action like you would not believe. I was right there in the apocalypse. One would think they wouldn't want to be right there, after the collapse of civilization, but I was sorry to see the story end. I bought the next book, Skin, immediately. I devoured that, pun intended, and read the short story and novella from the series, all the while begging Kylie to write more.

Her Flesh series reminded me how we can get stuck in what we know, and what we know we like, and not venture out to things that might just rock our worlds.

Along those lines, I was honored to read an advance copy of Consumed by J.R. Ward, the master of the vampire novel and the woman behind the Black Dagger Brotherhood. Consumed has nothing to do with vampires or anything paranormal, but instead focuses on firefighters and SWAT team members, exploring contemporary issues that include family relationships and gender inequality. It was fantastic.

Then there's Joey W. Hill's Natural Law. This phenomenal book inspired me to write a femme domme erotica series of my own. It's not something I'd ever thought I'd do. I think Hill's is better; Joey is a master of the craft. I've since read a number of her astonishingly good novels, and they're not to be missed.

And I'll also add Jenn Bennett, who has her Roaring Twenties series. It's a little bit historical, a little bit mystical, a little bit fantastical, and a whole lot readable. Grim Shadows (the second in the series, and my favorite) has a scene in a museum that's just awesome. I'll say no more. Just read it.

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Onward to the anthology that is sadly no longer available, The Devil's Doorbell, which was my intro to romance shorts and novellas, something I never thought I'd like. But I found it was what was missing in my busy life, the life of a writer and a reader who doesn't have a lot of time to lose myself in books, which is how I like to read. These stories were all exceptional. Every last one. And this experience led me to write for the fabulous 1,001 Dark Nights anthology.

And, of course, there's my favorite subgenre, historical romance. Judith McNaught, my ultimate, still reigns supreme. Her books stand the test of time, and if you haven't discovered her, you should, starting with A Kingdom of Dreams. Vintage romance still rocks it.

Loving historical romances, but having ventured away from them, I was a little concerned things would be different when I started reading Elizabeth Hoyt's Wicked Intentions. What had my time away done to my favorite subgenre? Suffice it to say, after a day and a half lost with my nose in Hoyt's book, I can say nothing's changed. Historical romances are still as brilliant as they always were, though thankfully a lot steamier.

So I urge you to branch out with your reading, too. Zombies? Yes! Don't like werewolves? Give them another shot. Do you scroll past an African American romance because it's something you've just never tried? Stop scrolling and give it a click, baby. Adore your second-chance love stories? They'll be waiting for you, but why not pop over to a hockey romance first?

Of course, to find the one for you, do your research. Read reviews. Ask your Goodreads friends.

And open your mind. It may change your world in a very good way.

Kristen Ashley's latest book, Wild Like the Wind, is now available. Add it to your Want to Read shelf here.



7 Great Books Hitting Shelves Today
Posted by Hayley on August 07, 2018

Need another excuse to go to the bookstore this week? We've got you covered with the buzziest new releases of the day.

To create our list, we focused on the top books Goodreads members can't wait to read, which we measure by how many times a book has been added to Want to Read shelves. All these highly anticipated titles are now available! Which ones catch your eye?


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You should read this book if you like: Thrillers, The Couple Next Door, the perfect getaway turned perfect nightmare, murder mysteries, getting snowed in, And Then There Were None

Check out our interview with Lapena here.


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You should read this book if you like: YA fiction, DC Comics, A Court of Thorns and Roses and Throne of Glass, thieves and vigilantes, Harley Quinn, dangerous missions



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You should read this book if you like: Nonfiction, understanding the American opioid crisis, unforgettable portraits of families and first responders, hope and solutions



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You should read this book if you like: Contemporary fiction, The Regulars, life-changing adventures, humor through heartache, sensual exploration, discovering the future you really want



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You should read this book if you like: Essays, the Maeve in America podcast, fearless and laugh-out-loud reflections on being a woman, New York City, awkward questions



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You should read this book if you like: Historical fiction, Two Rivers, novels based on true stories, Vladimir Nabokov's classic and controversial Lolita, true crime

Find Greenwood's book recommendations here.


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You should read this book if you like: History, Outside Shot, the daring sport of airplane racing, women breaking the glass ceiling, trailblazing heroes




The 20 Hottest Debuts of the Season
Posted by Cybil on August 06, 2018



Rejoice, readers! We're in debut season—that time of year when publishing houses tend to print a delightfully large number of new writers. And this year, between July and September, is proving to be a gold mine of authors to discover.

If you're in the mood for historical fiction, Heather Morris' World War II love story The Tattooist of Auschwitz is already an international hit. Or perhaps your reading will take you to Colombia during the time of drug lord Pablo Escobar's reign in Fruit of the Drunken Tree.

For readers looking for some fantasy, check out The Mermaid and Mrs. Hancock, set in 18th-century London, or head deep into a magical forest with the adult fairy tale The Sisters of the Winter Wood. For a dash of magical realism, turn to She Would Be King, a fantastical take on Liberia’s formation.

There's also some dystopia (Vox), an evil child (Baby Teeth), and a war hero-turned-bank robber-turned debut author's gritty first novel (Cherry). In short, you're bound to find a book for whatever reading mood you're in.

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