Recently Created Quotes

Quotes recently added to the Goodreads catalog.

Liane Moriarty
“But other times life changes in an instant, with a lightning stroke of good or bad luck, with glorious or tragic consequences. You win the lottery. You step out onto a pedestrian crossing at the wrong time. You get a phone call from a lost love at exactly the right time. And suddenly your life takes a violent swerve in an entirely new direction.”
Liane Moriarty, Nine Perfect Strangers
Liane Moriarty
“Sometimes your life changes so slowly and imperceptibly that you don’t notice it at all until one day you wake up and think: How did I get here?”
Liane Moriarty, Nine Perfect Strangers
“To get rid of heart pain, the worst kind of suffery in ones life that never stops tracing and slowly pushes liveliness down, you either face the cruel truth, lose everything and start again broken or abandon your single god-given chance and die.”
Glotnutis
Laura  Purcell
“Death, once conceived, was rapacious. It took all with it.”
Laura Purcell, The Silent Companions: A Novel
Neil Gaiman
“BELIEVE THAT YOU HAVE THE ABSOLUTE RIGHT TO THINK THINGS THAT I FIND OFFENSIVE, STUPID, PREPOSTEROUS OR DANGEROUS, AND THAT YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO SPEAK, WRITE OR DISTRIBUTE THESE THINGS, AND THAT I DO NOT HAVE THE RIGHT TO KILL YOU, MAIM YOU, HURT YOU OR TAKE AWAY YOUR LIBERTY OR PROPERTY BECAUSE I FIND YOUR IDEAS THREATENING OR INSULTING OR DOWNRIGHT DISGUSTING.”
Neil Gaiman, American Gods
“Self-discipline is hard, and the more projects you have on your plate, the more your willpower will have to stretch.”
Oscar Auliq-Ice
B.B. Easton
“I floated to school on a magic carpet woven from angel feathers and unicorn manes.”
B.B. Easton, SUIT
Petronius
“Heartened up by this story, I began to draw upon his more comprehensive knowledge as to the ages of the pictures and as to certain of the stories connected with them, upon which I was not clear; and I likewise inquired into the causes of the decadence of the present age, in which the most refined arts had perished, and among them painting, which had not left even the faintest trace of itself behind. "Greed of money," he replied, "has brought about these unaccountable changes. In the good old times, when virtue was her own reward, the fine arts flourished, and there was the keenest rivalry among men for fear that anything which could be of benefit to future generations should remain long undiscovered. Then it was that Democritus expressed the juices of all plants and spent his whole life in experiments, in order that no curative property should lurk unknown in stone or shrub. That he might understand the movements of heaven and the stars, Eudoxus grew old upon the summit of a lofty mountain: three times did Chrysippus purge his brain with hellebore, that his faculties might be equal to invention. Turn to the sculptors if you will; Lysippus perished from hunger while in profound meditation upon the lines of a single statue, and Myron, who almost embodied the souls of men and beasts in bronze, could not find an heir. And we, sodden with wine and women, cannot even appreciate the arts already practiced, we only criticise the past! We learn only vice, and teach it, too. What has become of logic? of astronomy? Where is the exquisite road to wisdom? Who even goes into a temple to make a vow, that he may achieve eloquence or bathe in the fountain of wisdom? And they do not pray for good health and a sound mind; before they even set foot upon the threshold of the temple, one promises a gift if only he may bury a rich relative; another, if he can but dig up a treasure, and still another, if he is permitted to amass thirty millions of sesterces in safety! The Senate itself, the exponent of all that should be right and just, is in the habit of promising a thousand pounds of gold to the capitol, and that no one may question the propriety of praying for money, it even decorates Jupiter himself with spoils'. Do not hesitate, therefore, at expressing your surprise at the deterioration of painting, since, by all the gods and men alike, a lump of gold is held to be more beautiful than anything ever created by those crazy little Greek fellows, Apelles and Phydias!”
Petronius, The Satyricon
Martina Cole
“ain’t learned much, but one thing I have learned is this: everyone wants to fuck you, girl, either physically or mentally. You have to put a limit on the shit you’re willing to take and no turning back.”
Martina Cole, The Runaway
Kerrigan Byrne
“I canna imagine one single day without ye in it. I feel this—perplexing and primitive drive to possess every part of ye. To be what no other man could possibly be in yer eyes. I want ye to belong to me and to tell me what to do. I want to be the answer to all yer infuriating questions. I want…”
Kerrigan Byrne, Reclaimed: A Highland Historical Trilogy (Highland Historical, #4-6)
Liane Moriarty
“He hadn’t left her for something better, but for something new.”
Liane Moriarty, Nine Perfect Strangers
Nizar Kabbani
“ამ ზღვას რომ ვუთხრა,
რას ვგრძნობ შენ მიმართ,
დატოვებს ნაპირებს, თევზებს, მოლუსკებს
და გამომყვება”
Nizar Kabbani
Markus Zusak
“When Liesel left that day, she said something with great uneasiness. In translation, two giant words were struggled with, carried on her shoulder and dropped as a bungling pair at Ilsa Hermann’s feet. They fell off sideways as the girl veered with them and could no longer sustain their weight. Together, they sat on the floor, large and loud, and clumsy.”
Markus Zusak, The Book Thief
“Someone or other must be to blame that I feel ill’ – this kind of conclusion is peculiar to all sick people, and in fact becomes more insistent, the more they remain in ignorance of the true reason, the phys- iological one, why they feel ill (this can, perhaps, be a disease of the nervus sympaticus, or lie in an excessive secretion of bile, or in a deficiency of potassium sulphate and phosphate in the blood, or in abdominal stricture interrupting the blood circulation, or in degeneration of the ovaries and such like). The sufferers, one and all, are frighteningly willing and inven- tive in their pretexts for painful emotions; they even enjoy being mis- trustful and dwelling on wrongs and imagined slights: they rummage through the bowels of their past and present for obscure, questionable stories that will allow them to wallow in tortured suspicion, and intoxi- cate themselves with their own poisonous wickedness – they rip open the oldest wounds and make themselves bleed to death from scars long-since healed, they make evil-doers out of friend, wife, child and anyone else near to them. ‘I suffer: someone or other must be guilty’ – and every sick sheep thinks the same. But his shepherd, the ascetic priest, says to him, ‘Quite right, my sheep! Somebody must be to blame: but you yourself are this somebody, you yourself alone are to blame for it, you yourself alone are to blame for yourself’ . . . That is bold enough, wrong enough: but at least one thing has been achieved by it, the direction of ressentiment is, as I said – changed.”
Nietszche
“The ascetic priest must count as pre- destined saviour, shepherd and defender of the sick herd in our eyes: only then do we understand his immensely historic mission. Rule over the suffering is his domain, his instinct directs him towards it and his own special skill, mastery and brand of happiness are to be had in it. He must be sick himself, he must really be a close relative of the sick and the destitute in order to understand them, – in order to come to an understanding with them; but he has to be strong, too, more master of himself than of others, actually unscathed in his will to power, so that he has the trust and fear of the sick and can be their support, defence, prop, compulsion, disciplinar- ian, tyrant, God. He has to defend his herd, – against whom? Against the healthy, no doubt, but also against envy of the healthy; he must be the natural opponent and despiser of all crude, stormy, unbridled, hard, vio- lently predatory health and mightiness. The priest is the first form of the more delicate animal which despises more easily than it hates. He will not be spared from waging war with predators, a war of cunning (of the ‘spirit’) rather than of force, it goes without saying, – in addition he will, if necessary, practically have to make himself into a new kind of predator, or at least signify it, – a new animal ferocity in which the polar bear, the lissom, cold tiger-cat on the watch and not least the fox, appear to be combined in a unity as attractive as it is frightening. If forced by necessity, he would probably even step among the other kind of beast of prey themselves, in all likelihood with bearish solemnity, venerable, clever, cold, deceptively superior, as the herald and mouthpiece of more mysterious powers, determined to sow suffering, division and self-contradiction on this ground wherever he can, and only too certain of his skill at being master of the suffering at any time. He brings ointments and balms with him, of course; but first he has to wound so that he can be the doctor; and whilst he soothes the pain caused by the wound, he poisons the wound at the same time – for that is what he is best trained to do, this magician and tamer of beasts of prey, whose mere presence necessarily makes every- thing healthy, sick, and everything sick, tame. Actually, he defends his sick herd well enough, this strange shepherd, – he even defends it against itself and against the wickedness, deceit, malice and everything else character- istic of all those who are diseased and sick, all of which smoulders in the herd itself, he carries out a clever, hard and secret struggle against anarchy and the ever-present threat of the inner disintegration of the herd, where that most dangerous of blasting and explosive materials, ressentiment, con- tinually piles up. His particular trick, and his prime use, is to detonate this explosive material without blowing up either the herd or the shepherd; if we wanted to sum up the value of the priestly existence in the shortest formula, we would immediately say: the priest is the direction-changer of ressentiment. For every sufferer instinctively looks for a cause of his dis- tress; more exactly, for a culprit, even more precisely for a guilty culprit who is receptive to distress, – in short, for a living being upon whom he can release his emotions, actually or in effigy, on some pretext or other: because the release of emotions is the greatest attempt at relief, or should I say, at anaesthetizing on the part of the sufferer, his involuntarily longed- for narcotic against pain of any kind. In my judgment, we find here the actual physiological causation of ressentiment, revenge and their ilk, in a yearning, then, to anaesthetize pain through emotion.”
Nietszche
Neil Gaiman
“Reading fiction builds empathy. You learn that everybody else out there in the world is a me, as well.”
Neil Gaiman
Nicki Koziarz
“Being offended is not a condition inflicted on us. It’s a stance we choose.”
Nicki Koziarz, Why Her?: 6 Truths We Need to Hear When Measuring Up Leaves Us Falling Behind
“These worm-eaten physiological casualties are all men of ressentiment, a whole, vibrating realm of subterranean revenge, inexhaustible and insatiable in its eruptions against the happy, and likewise in masquerades of revenge and pretexts for revenge: when will they actually achieve their ultimate, finest, most sublime triumph of revenge? Doubtless if they succeeded in shoving their own misery, in fact all misery, on to the conscience of the happy: so that the latter eventually start to be ashamed of their happiness and perhaps say to one another: ‘It’s a disgrace to be happy! There is too much misery!’ . . . But there could be no greater or more disastrous mis- understanding than for the happy, the successful, those powerful in body and soul to begin to doubt their right to happiness in this way. Away with this ‘world turned upside down’! Away with this disgraceful molly- coddling of feeling! That the sick should not make the healthy sick – and this would be that kind of mollycoddling – ought to be the chief concern on earth: – but for that, it is essential that the healthy should remain sep- arated from the sick, should even be spared the sight of the sick so that they do not confuse themselves with the sick. Or would it be their task, perhaps, to be nurses and doctors? . . . But they could not be more mis- taken and deceived about their task, – the higher ought not to abase itself as the tool of the lower, the pathos of distance ought to ensure that their tasks are kept separate for all eternity! Their right to be there, the prior- ity of the bell with a clear ring over the discordant and cracked one, is clearly a thousand times greater: they alone are guarantors of the future, they alone have a bounden duty to man’s future. What they can do, what they should do, is something the sick must never do: but so that they can do what only they should, why should they still be free to play doctor, comforter and ‘saviour’ to the sick? . . . And so we need good air! good air! At all events, well away from all madhouses and hospitals of culture! And so we need good company, our company! Or solitude, if need be! But at all events, keep away from the evil fumes of inner corruption and the secret, worm-eaten rottenness of disease! . . . So that we, my friends, can actually defend ourselves, at least for a while yet, against the two worst epidemics that could possibly have been set aside just for us – against great nausea at man! Against deep compassion for man! . . . If you have comprehended in full – and right here I demand profound apprehension, profound comprehension – why it can absolutely not be the task of the healthy to nurse the sick, to make the sick healthy, then another necessity has also been comprehended, – the necessity of doctors and nurses who are sick themselves: and now we have and hold with both hands the meaning of the ascetic priest.”
Nietszche
Lucinda Riley
“heavy”
Lucinda Riley, The Shadow Sister
“The sickly are the greatest danger to man: not the wicked, not the ‘beasts of prey’. Those who, from the start, are the unfortunate, the downtrodden, the broken – these are the ones, the weakest, who most undermine life amongst men, who introduce the deadliest poison and scepticism into our trust in life, in man, in our- selves. Where can we escape the surreptitious glance imparting a deep sadness, the backward glance of the born misfit revealing how such a man communes with himself, – that glance which is a sigh. ‘If only I were some other person!’ is what this glance sighs: ‘but there’s no hope of that. I am who I am: how could I get away from myself? And oh – I’m fed up with myself!’ . . . In such a soil of self-contempt, such a veritable swamp, every kind of weed and poisonous plant grows, all of them so small, hidden, dissembling and sugary. Here, the worms of revenge and rancour teem all round; here, the air stinks of things unrevealed and unconfessed; here, the web of the most wicked conspiracy is continually being spun, – the conspiracy of those who suffer against those who are successful and victorious, here, the sight of the victorious man is hated. And what mendacity to avoid admitting this hatred as hatred! What expenditure of big words and gestures, what an art of ‘righteous’ slander! These failures: what noble eloquence flows from their lips! How much sugared, slimy, humble humility swims in their eyes! What do they really want? At any rate, to represent justice, love, wisdom, superiority, that is the ambition of these who are ‘the lowest’, these sick people! And how skilful such an ambition makes them! In particular, we have to admire the counterfeiter’s skill with which the stamp of virtue, the ding-a-ling golden ring of virtue is now imitated. They have taken out a lease on virtue to keep it just for themselves, these weak and incurably sick people, there is no doubt about it: ‘Only we are good and just’ is what they say, ‘only we are the homines bonæ voluntatis’.90 They promenade in our midst like living reproaches, like warnings to us, – as though health, success, strength, pride and the feeling of power were in themselves depravities for which penance, bitter penance will one day be exacted: oh, how ready they themselves are, in the last resort, to make others penitent, how they thirst to be hangmen! Amongst them we find plenty of vengeance-seekers disguised as judges, with the word justice continually in their mouth like poisonous spittle, pursing their lips and always at the ready to spit at anybody who does not look discontented and who cheerfully goes his own way. Among their number there is no lack of that most disgusting type of dandy, the lying freaks who want to impersonate ‘beautiful souls’91 and put their wrecked sensuality on the market, swaddled in verses and other nappies, as ‘purity of the heart’: the type of moral onanists and ‘self-gratifiers’ [die Species der moralischen Onanisten und ‘Selbstbefriediger’]. The will of the sick to appear superior in any way, their instinct for secret paths, which lead to tyranny over the healthy, – where can it not be found, this will to power of precisely the weakest!”
Nietszche
David Foenkinos
“Il lui disait l'aimer malgré les changements de son corps, et elle aurait pu en conclure que son amour était profond; mais elle y vit surtout une preuve d'indifférence.”
David Foenkinos, Le Mystère Henri Pick
Dean Koontz
“those who cower forget how to stand and, in time, can only crawl”
Dean Koontz, Deeply Odd
Laura Schlessinger
“The current feminist agenda mostly accuses men or society in general, thereby ignoring the pivotal role played by women themselves in their life predicaments.”
Laura Schlessinger, Ten Stupid Things Women Do to Mess Up Their Lives
“What To Eat: Meat – non-processed, of course. The more organic, the better.”
Beth Gabriel, Paleo Gluten Free Slow Cooker Recipes: Against All Grains
Dean Koontz
“Maybe if everything was beautiful, nothing would be.”
Dean Koontz
Jessica Cluess
“Ladies are so much cleverer than gentlemen. They enjoy good conversation and great fun, two things without which I cannot live.” “Life truly is just a game to you, isn’t it?” I said, almost impressed.”
Jessica Cluess, A Shadow Bright and Burning
“If there is one question that defines my life, it is this: What did you do?”
Loren K. Jones, Liberator
Laura Schlessinger
“When you devote your life to ‘finding yourself,’ you probably won’t.”
Laura Schlessinger, Ten Stupid Things Women Do to Mess Up Their Lives
“do not dine with negative people, swallowing their poison will make you sick”
k. lily
“all of us—are crying silently, but we don’t let our emotions show.”
Helga Weiss, Helga's Diary: A Young Girl's Account of Life in a Concentration Camp
“標準美人”之所以使肖像漫畫高手感到棘手,是因為為她們的五官勻稱得失去特點。沒有特點,誇張也就失去了合理的根據(由於長得太勻稱,誇大、縮小都體現不了物件的特點)。”
蒋文兵
Laura Schlessinger
“When you devote your life to “finding yourself,” you probably won’t.”
Laura Schlessinger, Ten Stupid Things Women Do to Mess Up Their Lives
“I saw the devil today and he looked a lot like me”
Five Finger Death Punch, Five Finger Death Punch
tags: devil
Naomi Kramer
“your balls’ll go moldy!”
Naomi Kramer, Dead[ish]
Nicki Koziarz
“I’ve found the why her questions rarely pop into my mind on nice seventy-degree days when I’m feeling the most confident, happy, and content. But when I’m worn down? When I’m already feeling a little lonely, unsettled, or insecure? That’s when the question is just dangling there in front of me, waiting to be asked.”
Nicki Koziarz, Why Her?: 6 Truths We Need to Hear When Measuring Up Leaves Us Falling Behind
Zora Neale Hurston
“You can’t beat nobody down so low till you can rob ’em of they will.”
Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God
“for a variety of reasons, US citizens are increasingly likely to live in all-poor or all-rich neighborhoods and much less likely to live in communities where they would ever even have the chance of becoming friends with someone from a different class.”
Michael Rhodes, Practicing the King's Economy: Honoring Jesus in How We Work, Earn, Spend, Save, and Give
Martina Cole
“It was rumoured even her husband would cross the road rather than meet Joanie when she had the hump.”
Martina Cole, The Runaway
Michelle Madow
“Part of me hopes that Apollo is stuck in an Olympian god prison, and that he wants to see me, but he’s trapped and he can’t.”
Michelle Madow, The Head of Medusa
Petronius
“The trader trusts his fortune to the sea and takes his gains,
     The warrior, for his deeds, is girt with gold;
The wily sycophant lies drunk on purple counterpanes,
     Young wives must pay debauchees or they're cold.
But solitary, shivering, in tatters Genius stands
     Invoking a neglected art, for succor at its hands.”
Petronius, The Satyricon
Tezer Özlü
“Her gün geçtiğim için mi, yoksa boşluktaki duyguları yansıttığı için mi, yoksa herkes sözünü ettiği için mi, hep Sisler Bulvarı'nı okuyorum. Bekleyen gemiler. Uzak limanların özlemi. Düşlenen, erişilemeyen sevgililer.”
Tezer Özlü, Çocukluğun Soğuk Geceleri
Angela Duckworth
“We prefer mystery to mundanity.”
Angela Duckworth, Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance
K.A. Ware
“Nothing good happened after the teeth got involved. It was the grandmother equivalent of a girl taking off her earrings before a fight.”
K.A. Ware, Warrants and Onesies: A Swamp Bottom Novella
“Hardly any of the names of ancient artists are recorded, even though they did more for the happiness of their people than the pharoahs, generals, and world rulers whose pride filled the world with sorrow.”
Emil Nolde
“Minds which don't capture exegesis in brevity will certainly not understand wisdom spoken in a sentence .So what do you do ? Walk out with a smile, breathe the air around and thank God for saving your time.”
Henrietta Newton Martin , Legal Consultant & Author
“He who fails to rule himself, will be ruled by others”
Nietzsche
Eric Maisel
“The ascending spiral, one of the central images of early American letters and employed especially by Emerson, is probably an unconscious piece of every American's personal mythology. Its shorthand name is progress.”
Eric Maisel
John M. Sheehan
“Pastors/Christians who pride themselves for not have a degree and those who pride themselves for having a degree have one thing in common; both are speaking from foolish pride. Proverbs 14:3-13”
John M. Sheehan, Walking In The Newness Of Christ: Born Again Devotional
Zora Neale Hurston
“Ships at a distance have every man’s wish on board. For some they come in with the tide. For others they sail forever on the horizon, never out of sight, never landing until the Watcher turns his eyes away in resignation, his dreams mocked to death by Time. That is the life of men. Now, women forget all those things they don’t want to remember, and remember everything they don’t want to forget. The dream is the truth. Then they act and do things accordingly.”
Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God
Charles Dickens
“Do I go to the theatre to be lectured? No, Pip. If I wanted that, I'd go to church. What's the legitimate object of the drama, Pip? Human nature. What are legs? Human nature.”
Charles Dickens, Charles Dickens' Martin Chuzzlewit [Illustrated edition]
John Cheever
“One not only writes a book. One lives it. Upon completing it there are certain symptoms of death.”
John Cheever
Charles Dickens
“Where's Pip? I want to see Pip. Produce Pip!"—"What's the row, my lord?"—"Shakspeare's an infernal humbug, Pip! What's the good of Shakspeare, Pip? I never read him. What the devil is it all about, Pip? There's a lot of feet in Shakspeare's verse, but there an't any legs worth mentioning in Shakspeare's plays, are there, Pip? Juliet, Desdemona, Lady Macbeth, and all the rest of 'em, whatever their names are, might as well have no legs at all, for anything the audience know about it, Pip. Why, in that respect they're all Miss Biffins to the audience, Pip. I'll tell you what it is. What the people call dramatic poetry is a collection of sermons. Do I go to the theatre to be lectured? No, Pip. If I wanted that, I'd go to church. What's the legitimate object of the drama, Pip? Human nature. What are legs? Human nature. Then let us have plenty of leg pieces, Pip, and I'll stand by you, my buck!" and I am proud to say,' added Pip, 'that he did stand by me, handsomely.”
Charles Dickens, Charles Dickens' Martin Chuzzlewit [Illustrated edition]
Craig D. Lounsbrough
“Easter is the one morning in all of history where the dawn came twice; once on the eastern horizon and again in eternity.”
Craig D. Lounsbrough
James Patterson
“She didn't have a snowball's chance in a microwave oven of being the "chosen one.”
James Patterson, Max Einstein: The Genius Experiment
James Baldwin
“And he knew again that she was not saying everything she meant; in a kind of secret language she was telling him today something that he must remember and understand tomorrow”
James Baldwin, Go Tell It on the Mountain
“I’m lucky, today and every day I’m alive. I still have time to get things done, to enjoy the gift of life, and to do something with it, to make a significant contribution.” I say”
David D. Corbett, Portfolio Life: The New Path to Work, Purpose, and Passion After 50
Dan S. Kennedy
“People often ask me why I have written so many books and why I keep writing books, and this is the principal reason: it is a key to making attachment to me valuable to others, whether that attachment is directly paid for “cafeteria-style,” by renting me as a speaker, guest coach at mastermind meetings, coauthor, and so on, or is the glue of an ongoing relationship, as it is for me with GKIC and several other companies I have promoted ties to, such as the direct marketing software firm, Infusionsoft.”
Dan S. Kennedy, Book The Business: How To Make BIG MONEY With Your Book Without Even Selling A Single Copy
“EL HOMBRE - ...No estamos acostumbrados a dar; solo nos gusta recibir, en lo cual imitamos a los dioses. Para convencerte, no tienes más que mirarles a las manos; sus imágenes, cuando les pedimos dones y mercedes, nos alargan las manos vueltas hacia arriba; no en actitud de dar sino de recibir.”
Aristófanes, La asamblea de las mujeres
Daniel L. Everett
“If it is correct that language is a cultural artefact, the absence of a specialised brain area for it is predicted. If this idea is wrong, though, then language is more like vision and there should be evidence that language is innately linked to a particular location of the brain, specialised for language.”
Daniel L. Everett, How Language Began: The Story of Humanity’s Greatest Invention
Daniel L. Everett
“Thus the brain is a physical organ, a constituent of the body, as all other organs are. This embodiment, along with the role of culture in our thinking, means that the brain is an organ physically integrated into the world through a body, and not a computer.”
Daniel L. Everett, How Language Began: The Story of Humanity’s Greatest Invention
Kris Michaels
“and thank God you have a heart that beats even though it bleeds for those you love.”
Kris Michaels, Christmas with the Kings
“That’s what money is – a belief that there is value.”
Ray Hammond, Emergence
George Bacovia
“Controversă

Era acel tânăr prea singur!
Dar toți îl iubeau...
- Atunci, nu era așa singur!
Sau ceilalți nu erau.”
George Bacovia, Plumb
Liane Moriarty
“Nothing is forever except change.”
Liane Moriarty, Nine Perfect Strangers
Daniel L. Everett
“Grammar is symbols used together. Syntax is the arrangement of those symbols as they are used together.”
Daniel L. Everett, How Language Began: The Story of Humanity’s Greatest Invention
Lauren Oliver
“When you can’t count on anything else, you can count on the news to make you sick.”
Lauren Oliver, Broken Things
Daniel L. Everett
“In making the assumption that human language = Merge, researchers arguably overestimate the importance of syntax, which plays only a minor role in human language as a means to organise information flow.”
Daniel L. Everett, How Language Began: The Story of Humanity’s Greatest Invention
Terry Pratchett
“Darleen kicked a fishnet leg at a man trying to climb on the cart, causing with a stiletto heel what bromide in your tea is reputed to take several weeks to achieve.”
Terry Pratchett, The Last Continent
Michael Palin
“I mumble something, Terry J bravely launches into a school reminiscence. TG, with consummate timing, kicks over the urn with Graham’s ashes in. From then on, we’re invincible.”
Michael Palin, Travelling to Work: Diaries 1988-1998
Ceillie Simkiss
“Elena and her brothers had always had a strong relationship ranging from best friends to worst enemies, but now that they were grown, that relationship was best described as partners in crime.”
Ceillie Simkiss, Wrapped Up In You
“Rumor has it that, when they shut down the IBM 7094 at MIT in 1973, they found a low-priority process that had been submitted in 1967 and had not yet been run.”
Abraham Silberschatz, Operating System Concepts
“Hell,
Stay a while;
We peaceful.

old man pats the empty seat
next to him; a car passes”
Joe Christmas , ONE DOLLAR in November
tags: poetry
Sophie  Davis
“I’d figured she’d just choose some obscure state to hide out in. Like Idaho.”
Sophie Davis, Unforgettable
Laurence Sterne
“las leyes humanas no son el resultado de una elección libre original, sino el de la pura necesidad de poner límites a los perjudiciales efectos de aquellas conciencias que no constituyen ley para sí mismas; y están ideadas con el buen propósito de que, merced a las numerosas cauciones estipuladas de antemano,—en aquellos casos de corrupción y de extravío en los que ni los principios ni el freno de la conciencia lograrán enderezarnos,—suplan la fuerza de éstos y, mediante los horrores de la cárcel y la soga, nos obliguen a seguir por el camino recto’.”
Laurence Sterne, Tristram Shandy
Chip Heath
“What’s indisputable is that when we assess our experiences, we don’t average our minute-by-minute sensations. Rather, we tend to remember flagship moments: the peaks, the pits, and the transitions.”
Chip Heath, The Power of Moments: Why Certain Moments Have Extraordinary Impact
David Hume
“Thus if instead of saying, that in war the weaker have always recourse to negotiation, we should say, that they have always recourse to conquest, the custom, which we have acquired of attributing certain relations to ideas, still follows the words, and makes us immediately perceive the absurdity of that proposition; in the same manner as one particular idea may serve us in reasoning concerning other ideas, however different from it in several circumstances.”
David Hume, A Treatise Of Human Nature
“Certain options and features of a program may be used rarely. For instance, the routines on U.S. government computers that balance the budget have not been used in many years.”
Abraham Silberschatz, Operating System Concepts
Naomi Kramer
“Love is never easy.”
Naomi Kramer, Dead[ish]
Craig D. Lounsbrough
“How do we explain God? Maybe we explain Him as unexplainable.”
Craig D. Lounsbrough
David Hume
“Secondly, we have several instances of habits, which may be revived by one single word; as when a person, who has by rote any periods of a discourse, or any number of verses, will be put in remembrance of the whole, which he is at a loss to recollect, by that single word or expression, with which they begin.”
David Hume, A Treatise Of Human Nature
Craig D. Lounsbrough
“I am aware of what I am, but I am likewise aware of what I am not. And if I’ve refused to let God shape my life, I’m probably not happy with either.”
Craig D. Lounsbrough
Chip Heath
“in recalling an experience, we ignore most of what happened and focus instead on a few particular moments.”
Chip Heath, The Power of Moments: Why Certain Moments Have Extraordinary Impact
Naomi Kramer
“the sex was fantastic”
Naomi Kramer, Dead[ish]
Naomi Kramer
“butt cheeks freshly scrubbed,”
Naomi Kramer, Dead[ish]
Addison Cain
“Everything you do here hurts”
Addison Cain, The Golden Line
Chip Heath
“Our lives are measured in moments, and defining moments are the ones that endure in our memories.”
Chip Heath, The Power of Moments: Why Certain Moments Have Extraordinary Impact
“Because of the constant stress, my adrenal glands began to fail.  My hair and nails stopped growing.  I barely had the energy to get out of bed in the morning to do my job, but I took more vitamins and dug my heels in, determined to persevere.  I learned later that the techniques that were being used on me are utilized in what's called a “soft kill” in the intelligence community.  I was being tortured slowly, in plain sight, and there was little I could do to stop it, except move again.”
E.J. Wyatt, The Devil Beside Me: Gang Stalking, The Secret War and How to Win
Laurence Sterne
“Si alguien duda de su veracidad, o piensa que no es posible que un hombre se engañe a sí mismo de este modo,—debo aconsejarle que por un momento se remita a sus propias reflexiones; y entonces podré aventurarme a poner por testigo de mis aseveraciones a su propio corazón’.”
Laurence Sterne, Tristram Shandy
Craig D. Lounsbrough
“We have equated an end with the idea of ‘termination’ when in fact an end is the beginning of ‘germination.”
Craig D. Lounsbrough
“3am:
The Witching Hour;
Crazy shit’n the Witching Hour.”
Joe Christmas , ONE DOLLAR in November
tags: poetry
Naomi Kramer
“My dick’s waving hello in the breeze.”
Naomi Kramer, Dead[ish]
“I felt a pervasive sense of neediness amongst these people, like I was being energetically yanked on, all day.  They were spectators instead of players in the game of life, obsessed with anyone in their vicinity who had anything resembling a normal adult life, full of activities that had nothing to do with violating people's privacy.  They were extremely territorial.  They had no regard for the rights and boundaries of others.  They had no sense of self.  They were walking black holes, no light from within, only a foreboding, grasping need, as they attached themselves to your existence, these total strangers with no real friends, no hobbies, no dreams,  and apparently, no souls or higher consciousness, as I will describe later. The stress of being a kind of prisoner whenever I was home started affecting my health.”
E.J. Wyatt, The Devil Beside Me: Gang Stalking, The Secret War and How to Win
Naomi Kramer
“I’m dead because my dumbarse boyfriend shot me and it hurt like hell and that’s all I remember, to be honest. Until I woke up without a body. Now I know from books”
Naomi Kramer, Dead[ish]
Craig D. Lounsbrough
“Has my life been cheated by the shortness of the time afforded me, or is it possible that the greater part of my life has been saved for a time where there is no time?”
Craig D. Lounsbrough
“I felt a pervasive sense of neediness amongst these people, like I was being energetically yanked on, all day.  They were spectators instead of players in the game of life, obsessed with anyone in their vicinity who had anything resembling a normal adult life,”
E.J. Wyatt, The Devil Beside Me: Gang Stalking, The Secret War and How to Win
“the dirt people.
they dirt shuffled.
then dirt died.”
Joe Christmas , ONE DOLLAR in November
tags: poetry
Craig D. Lounsbrough
“God reached in because I had so thoroughly destroyed my life that I could not find a single gap in the carnage through which I could reach out.”
Craig D. Lounsbrough
Eric Schmidt
“Uyanmak için normalde çalar saat kullanmıyor olacaksınız. Onun yerine taze pişirilmiş bir kahve kokusu, otomatik açılan perdeler sayesinde odaya dolan gün ışığı ve ileri teknoloji ürünü yatağınızın yumuşak sırt masajıyla açacaksınız gözlerinizi. Büyük olasılıkla dinlenmiş olarak kalkacaksınız yataktan, çünkü yatağın içinde, uyku ritminizi izleyerek uyanma anınızı bir REM döngüsünü bozmayacak şekilde titizlikle ayarlayan özel bir sensör bulunacak”
Eric Schmidt, The New Digital Age: Reshaping the Future of People, Nations and Business
“Moon’s shore purdy tanite—

Wont’cha jes’ lissin at them crickits.”
Joe Christmas , ONE DOLLAR in November
tags: poetry
V.C. Andrews
“Good-bye to lonely nights. Good-bye to this world of fantasy and dreams.
Good-bye to my father's face of pity and to my own forlorn look in the mirror.”
V.C. Andrews, Garden of Shadows

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