The Book of Tea Quotes

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The Book of Tea The Book of Tea by Kakuzō Okakura
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The Book of Tea Quotes Showing 1-30 of 139
“In joy or sadness flowers are our constant friends.”
Okakura Kakuzo, The Book Of Tea
“Tea ... is a religion of the art of life.”
Kakuzō Okakura, The Book of Tea
tags: tea
“Teaism is a cult founded on the adoration of the beautiful among the sordid facts of everyday existence. It inculcates purity and harmony, the mystery of mutual charity, the romanticism of the social order. It is essentially a worship of the Imperfect, as it is a tender attempt to accomplish something possible in this impossible thing we know as life.”
Kakuzo Okakura, The Book of Tea
“True beauty could be discovered only by one who mentally complete the incomplete.”
Kakuzō Okakura, The Book of Tea
“Our mind is the canvas on which the artists lay their colour; their pigments are our emotions; their chiaroscuro the light of joy, the shadow of sadness. The masterpiece is of ourselves, as we are of the masterpiece.”
Kakuzō Okakura, The Book of Tea
“Translation is always a treason, and as a Ming author observes, can at its best be only the reverse side of a brocade- all the threads are there, but not the subtlety of colour or design.”
Kakuzo Okakura, The Book of Tea
“But when we consider how small after all the cup of human enjoyment is, how soon overflowed with tears, how easily drained to the dregs in our quenchless thirst for infinity, we shall not blame ourselves for making so much of the tea-cup.”
Kakuzō Okakura, The Book of Tea
“The art of life lies in a constant readjustment to our surroundings.”
Kakuzo Okakura, The Book of Tea
“Let us dream of evanescence, and linger in the beautiful foolishness of things.”
Kakuzō Okakura, The Book of Tea
“Meanwhile, let us have a sip of tea. The afternoon glow is brightening the bamboos, the fountains are bubbling with delight, the soughing of the pines is heard in our kettle. Let us dream of evanescence and linger in the beautiful foolishness of things.”
Kakuzō Okakura, The Book of Tea
“People are not taught to be really virtuous, but to behave properly.”
Kakuzō Okakura, The Book of Tea
“In the liquid amber within the ivory porcelain, the initiated may touch the sweet reticence of Confucius, the piquancy of Laotse, and the ethereal aroma of Sakyamuni himself.”
Kakuzo Okakura, The Book of Tea
“Perfection is everywhere if we only choose to recognise it.”
Kakuzō Okakura, The Book of Tea
“Much has been said of the aesthetic values of chanoyu- the love of the subdued and austere- most commonly characterized by the term, wabi. Wabi originally suggested an atmosphere of desolation, both in the sense of solitariness and in the sense of the poverty of things. In the long history of various Japanese arts, the sense of wabi gradually came to take on a positive meaning to be recognized for its profound religious sense. ...the related term, sabi,... It was mid-winter, and the water's surface was covered with the withered leaves of the of the lotuses. Suddenly I realized that the flowers had not simply dried up, but that they embodied, in their decomposition, the fullness of life that would emerge again in their natural beauty.”
Okakura Kakuzo, The Book Of Tea
“We are ever brutal to those who love and serve us in silence, but the time may come when, for our cruelty, we shall be deserted by these best friends of ours.”
Kakuzō Okakura, The Book of Tea
“It has not the arrogance of wine, the self- consciousness of coffee, nor the simpering innocence of cocoa.”
Kakuzō Okakura, The Book of Tea
“Everyone has to build anew his sky of hope and peace.”
Kakuzo Okakura, The Book of Tea
“It has been said that man at ten is an animal, at twenty a lunatic, at thirty a failure, at forty a fraud, and at fifty a criminal.”
Okakura Kakuzo 1862-1913, The Book of Tea
“Fain would we remain barbarians, if our claim to civilization were to be based on the gruesome glory of war.”
Kakuzo Okakura, The Book of Tea
“We classify too much and enjoy too little.”
Okakura Kakuzō, The Book of Tea
“In my young days I praised the master whose pictures I liked, but as my judgment matured I praised myself for liking what the masters had chosen to have me like.”
Kakuzō Okakura, The Book of Tea
“Our standards of morality are begotten of the past needs of society, but is society to remain always the same? The observance of communal traditions involves a constant sacrifice of the individual to the state. Education, in order to keep up the mighty delusion, encourages a species of ignorance. People are not taught to be really virtuous, but to behave properly. We are wicked because we are frightfully self-conscious. We nurse a conscience because we are afraid to tell the truth to others; we take refuge in pride because we are afraid to tell the truth to ourselves. How can one be serious with the world when the world itself is so ridiculous!”
Kakuzō Okakura, The Book of Tea
“The Taoist and Zen conception of perfection... the dynamic nature of their philosophy laid more stress upon the process through which perfection was sought than upon perfection itself. True beauty could be discovered only by one who mentally completed the incomplete. The virility of life and art lay in its possibilities for growth.”
Okakura Kakuzo, The Book Of Tea
“Approach a great painting as thou wouldst approach a great prince.”
Kakuzō Okakura, The Book of Tea
tags: art
“For life is an expression, our unconscious actions the constant betrayal of our innermost thought.”
Kakuzo Okakura, The Book of Tea
“We must remember, however, that art is of value only to the extent that it speaks to us. It might be a universal language if we ourselves were universal in our sympathies.”
Kakuzō Okakura, The Book of Tea
“Have you not noticed that the wild flowers are becoming scarcer every year? It may be that their wise men have told them to depart till man becomes more human. Perhaps they have migrated to heaven.”
Kakuzō Okakura, The Book of Tea
“[Tea-masters] have given emphasis to our natural love of simplicity, and shown us the beauty of humility. In fact, through their teachings tea has entered the life of the people.”
Kakuzō Okakura, The Book of Tea
“The ancient sages never put their teachings in systematic form. They spoke in paradoxes, for they were afraid of uttering half-truths. They began by talking like fools and ended up making their hearers wise.”
Kakuzō Okakura, The Book of Tea
“Nothing is more hallowing than the union of kindred spirits in art. At the moment of meeting, the art lover transcends himself.”
Kakuzō Okakura, The Book of Tea

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